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Bad tempered pigs, circus elephants, children playing on the streets and women sitting on their porches shelling peas – these were all part of everyday life in a legendary tight-knit community where you had to pay a toll and hop over someone’s back wall to get in.

A prolific activist’s tale of fighting fascists with the 43 Group after the Second World War is brought to life in an audio walk about Hackney’s different ‘frontlines’. Emma Bartholomew reports

An app will bring tales of resistance and equality in Hackney to life – courtesy of Dalston’s radical bookshop. Emma Bartholomew reports

Alan Denney has been photographing our borough since 1976. He talks Emma Bartholomew through five that are close to his heart.

Historian Prof Ged Martin documents the rise and fall of sootigine, a cheap and, as it turned out, pretty damaging fertiliser made in Hackney Downs in the 1880s.

The chairman of one of the most famous Sunday leagues in the world has launched a scathing attack on the FA, David Beckham and green campaigners.

Campaigners have welcomed the decision to defer a controversial luxury housing development on the site of the old bingo hall in Hackney Road.

Hackney could soon be getting another of its old cinemas back. Auro Foxcroft, the man behind Shoreditch spot Village Underground, wants to dust off the seats of the old ABC and Savoy cinema. We had a chat with him

The Geffrye has secured £12m towards its £15m revamp, which is set to open up previously unexplored parts of the museum of the home.

As the consultation on Haggerston Baths’ decidedly dry future kicks off, the Gazette looks back at the pool’s 114-year history.

Meet the raggedy band of volunteers who spend their spare time keeping hotshot developers in line. The Gazette caught up with members of Hackney’s Conservation Area Advisory Committees to find out what they do.

Andrew Holligan captured life in Dalston three decades ago on a 1950s camera. He shares his snaps – and explains how the project came about.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago.

Sam Roberts has spent years hunting down old adverts painted on Hackney’s buildings. He tells the Gazette about his love for “ghost signs”.

A “micro-hotel” and a shopping centre are among the final plans for Haggerston Baths – and now the town hall wants to know what you think.

As his photographs of the Holly Street estate go on show, Tom Hunter tells The Gazette about life on the 18th floor

Zeka Alsancak and his fellow Turkish Cypriots set up a community centre in Hackney 40 years ago. The Gazette joins him looking back

The Gazette speaks to filmmaker Derek Smith, whose chance discovery of a photo has led to the creation of a whole museum exhibition about the estate where he lives

The Gazette discovers the history of the Hackney associations that were infiltrated by police during the late 1990s.

Campaigners have won their battle to stop Sainsbury’s opening a Local store in the old Highbury Vale police station.

Entertainer Len Belmont tells us how life as one of the country’s top ventriloquist and magic acts landed him a job on C4 show TFI Friday.

Hackney Museum wants to right a wrong: it doesn’t have enough gay history in its archive. Emma Bartholomew reports on the launch of a project to change that.

Harvey Waterman, now 80, tells Emma Bartholomew about his youth in the mental institution he was sent to age four

Aviva’s bid to tap into the trendiness of Hoxton has been savaged by historians and neighbours – who are concerned they will turn the “historic home of the Hackney artist” into a “corporate playground”.

A book will be published this year to mark 50 years of the Hackney Society. Emma Bartholomew looks back in time at its creation in 1967

The Gazette looks back at the history of Britannia Leisure Centre – which is at risk of demolition if council plans come to fruition.

You’ve probably walked past these buildings – and ignored them – dozens of times. But photographer Simon Phipps feels it’s time we started to celebrate the post-war brutalist architecture that is all over the capital.

The Rio is launching a campaign this year to restore the Art Deco picture palace to its former glory. Emma Bartholomew looks back at its past century.

A campaign has been launched to give a Stoke Newington pub protected status over fears it could become yet another restaurant.

A historian who knows more about Stoke Newington than most has decided to share his archives with, well, the whole world.

Reporter Emma Bartholomew speaks to Peter the Pleater, who is leaving his eponymous Shoreditch premises - 34 years after setting up shop there

The Rochester Castle has been a popular Stoke Newington boozer for centuries. We delved into its past (and discovered its nickname among regulars)

St Augustine’s Tower is the only grotto in Hackney over 500 years old. Emma Bartholomew hears from Laurie Elks about its history as a social, sacred and political landmark.

Eithne Nightingale, a writer, photographer and researcher has been studying child migration to the East End for more than 10 years. Now, she and producer Mitch Harris have made films documenting the incredible journeys made by three children to Hackney.

Finsbury Park’s running track has endured a troubled recent history. But years of hard work mean our athletics clubs have an exciting future, the Gazette hears.

It’s important to the life of the theatre, and key to its survival and growth. Susie McKenna chats with The Gazette about the history of panto at the Empire

Mayor of Hackney Philip Glanville held his own against former Newsnight presenter Jeremy Paxman, when the abrasive interviewer tried to insinuate he wasn’t in touch with his electorate.

Students at The Urswick School, Paragon Road, marked Armistice Day with a special service on Friday morning.

Hackney residents joined ex-service men and women to remember the fallen at the borough’s Remembrance Sunday parade and church service on Sunday,

As Stoke Newington Methodist Church marks its double centenary, Emma Bartholomew hears about some of its longest-serving players

It may have lasted just nine months, but the 1968 Antiuniversity’s legacy has endured. Sam Gelder got educated on the radical project – and its revival

Emma Bartholomew meets the Andersons as the family wind down their 160-year-old Hoxton bakery firm

Campaigners for Dalston music venue Passing Clouds will have the chance to buy the building after it was given protected status by Hackney Council.

Newington Green Unitarian Church is in desperate need of repair. Nothing unusual there. What sets it apart, finds James Morris, are the 300 years of radical history witnessed by its crumbling walls.

Emma Bartholomew meets author Patrick Wiegand, whose grandparents ran an orphanage in Dalston – for Germans

As protesters occupy the old Camelot HQ in Hoxton, Emma Bartholomew explores Hackney’s squatting history – and finds some surprises.

Sixth-formers from four Hackney schools took a trip to Auschwitz as part of a campaign to ensure the terrible lessons of the Second World War are remembered by this generation. The Gazette was there.

Ever wondered about the history of Stoke Newington’s grand old buildings? Well now you can quite literally take a glimpse into the past.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago. This week features a “horrible hospital wrangle” and a murder trial.

A travelling exhibition celebrating the contributions of Caribbean nurses, who were recruited to the NHS between 1949 and 1970, sparked vivid memories for one 81-year-old of her time working on a psychiatric ward.

Vivian Usherwood is the subject of an exhibition for Black History Month. Emma Bartholomew discovers the tragic Hackney boy whose poetry found its way into schools across the country.

Two inspirational community leaders were honoured at a cultural event celebrating Black History month from a Francophone perspective.

As Hackney Chess Club is crowned the best in England, we took a look at its humble beginnings and heard why it’s not just a ‘stuffy old club’.

A hero firefighter who died on a job 47 years ago has been honoured with a plaque at Shoreditch Fire Station.

Old Gazette cuttings discovered in a dusty old book in west London have shone a light on the chronic housing problem for injured veterans after the First World War.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago. This week features a sadly familiar housing problem blighting Hackney in 1986.

The Baddeley Brothers, a family of printers, have been at the heart of Hackney’s industry for more than 150 years. We take a look at the family tree.

Emma Bartholomew meets Norris Raymond, who has been working with leather and sheepskin in the East End since the 1960s.

It may have been closed four weeks ago but the community support for Passing Clouds is alive and well judging by the scenes in Dalston on Saturday.

They escaped from the Nazis, fled persecution in eastern Europe and moved from an overpopulated East End. And they made Hackney their home.

Spectacular costumes, breathtaking dancing, irresistible music. Emma Bartholomew looks back at Hackney’s carnival history.

As one of Hackney’s four licensed sex venues closes down, Emma Bartholomew looks back on the heyday of the Shoreditch ‘strip mile’.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago. This week features an early court date for the Kray twins, back in 1956.

Youngsters were challenged to design and build a huge Meccano-style entrance way for Sutton House to prove that children can be as capable and inventive as adults when it comes to architecture.

Maisie Spooner, who served in the Auxiliary Fire Service in the war, died last month. The Gazette finds out how Hackney owes her a huge debt.

Filmmaker Ashton John has captured four people’s memories of Hackney dating back as far as 70 years. Emma Bartholomew previews his exhibition which will be showing at the Bootstrap building in Ashwin Street.

The historic Well Street Market is set to reopen in October, eight years after traders packed up their stalls and left.

The Clowns’ Gallery in Dalston opens just once a month. The Gazette asks Mattie, Bluebottle, Spotty and Gingernutt about the history behind its doors.

Not interested in paying upwards of £4.50 for a pint? Fed up of fancy sausage rolls and scotch eggs? Sam Gelder tells the 150-year story of one of Hackney’s last “proper” pubs.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago.

Parents and tots at Sandbrook Nursery are celebrating 40 years since it moved into its Stoke Newington home. Reporter Emma Bartholomew looks back at its roots.

Café owner Arthur Woodham tells Emma Bartholomew how his business survived the Blitz, rationing and gentrification – and how, aged 89, he still serves customers every day.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago.

Dave Swindells witnessed the emergence of the rave scene in 1988 and Hackney’s emergence as a “go-to” nightlife area.

Nicola Thorp’s flat shoes – which helped make a stand for female workers – have gone on display at Hackney Museum.

Previously unexplored parts of The Geffrye Museum are set to be opened up to the public in a £15m revamp, and a former Victorian pub will be turned into a café and arts space.

Off duty clowns will be on hand to tell visitors about their art, at a monthly open day at the Clowns’ Gallery Museum today from noon to 5pm.

A new exhibition on how Hackney has always been “the place to be” and “done things in the biggest and best way” in the world of entertainment has launched at Hackney Museum.

Hundreds of spectators are expected for Sunday’s free grand festival to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the opening of the Regent’s Canal, with narrowboats running trips by east London’s Victoria Park.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago.

Millions of people will make a “once in a generation” decision today when they vote in the EU Referendum – but for many it’s not the first time.

Enthusiastic youngsters turned up to learn a thing or two about traditional home crafts from the over 70s like jam-making, sewing and weaving.

Experts churning up new evidence of how the first Londoners lived day-to-day in ancient Roman times have discovered their text messages written on tablets 19 centuries before today’s electronic digital versions.

A lively Irish dance workshop, a fun-filled Gypsy sing along and walking treasure hunt tours of Hackney are just a handful of the free events laid on for June to celebrate Gypsy, Roma and Traveller History Month.

A 450-year-old children’s bird whistle is among artefacts unearthed by archaeologists excavating Shakespeare’s historic Curtain Theatre in Shoreditch.

Clissold Park would have been built on in the 1880s if it wasn’t for a passionate campaign to preserve it for the public. The dramatic details have recently come to light, 127 years after it opened. Stoke Newington historian Amir Dotan provides a glimpse into the saga.

Archaeologists began excavating one of Shakespeare’s lesser known playhouses today – the Curtain Theatre where Henry V was first performed, which will be preserved as a cultural centre in situ once the dig is complete.

Every now and then, it’s important to stop and appreciate the history that surrounds you – that’s the belief of tour guide Sean Gubbins from Walk Hackney. So on a sunny(ish) Friday, Sean gives Victoria Ibitoye a sneak preview of his Heart of Hackney tour

Campaigners have declared victory in east London today in the latest round over the controversial scheme for a wall of skyscrapers at the old Bishopsgate goodsyard site that would overshadow Shoreditch.

The decision on whether the controversial wall of skyscrapers planned for the old Bishopsgate goodsyard on the fringe of the City of London should go ahead has been delayed.

London Mayor Boris Johnson has sent a letter to the developers, Hammerson’s, offering them a chance to modify their planning application, it is understood.

The Buck stops with Boris Johnson over whether the controversial Bishopsgate goodsyard scheme for seven skyscrapers shadowing over Shoreditch and Spitalfields should go ahead—now his own planning officers want it rejected.

Attempted cannabis cultivation, liquid lunches and a chronic lack of work ethic – oh, what it was like to be a civil servant in the 1960s.

A historian who spent almost 40 years creating an incredible encyclopaedia – described as the “Holy Grail” of all things Stoke Newington – has died aged 80.

Another ‘Stone Henge’ even bigger than the world famous heritage site and dating back nearly 5,500 years has been discovered by archaeologists.

Paul Daly moved to the forgotten Hoxton Square in 1988 as a squatter. He’s now a successful bar owner and the area he helped to create is booming. Sam Gelder met him for a chat.

Tour guide Rob Smith tells the Gazette about the community of dissenters that took up residence in Newington Green 250 years ago – and inspired three US Founding Fathers and women’s rights activist Mary Wollstonecraft

Hackney mayor Jules Pipe has backed an “eastern phase” of the £27bn Crossrail 2 project after it was confirmed by George Osborne in his Budget.

A public loo that’s been left to rot for three decades will soon be given a new lease of life, when it is converted into an “old fashioned village hall”.

Bookworms were treated to a story or two by a children’s author who popped into their school this week.

“When computers came in there was a readiness to just bin everything, but there’s a certain quality in letterpress you can’t beat.”

Dalston is set to get a new railway station after Chancellor George Osborne signed off the multi-billion pound Crossrail 2 project in his Budget.

There seems no pity for George Cornell’s murder at Whitechapel’s Blind Beggar pub by notorious gangster Ronnie Kray half-a-century later.

Hackney could be in line for a third cinema by the summer if a £45,000 campaign to resurrect an Edwardian picture palace is successful.

Previously unexplored parts of The Geffrye Museum could be opened up to the public in a £15m revamp.

The stories of a group of footballers who served in the First World War are being brought to life by researchers who are scouring old editions of the Hackney Gazette.

Housing developer Vision Homes has been urged not to break its promise to donate a heritage building likened to a “Victorian time capsule” as a museum.

Almost 600 local residents and visitors from across London wrapped up warm to attend the popular twilight Farewell to Christmas ceremony at the Geffrye Museum.

Georgian and Victorian buildings and a vibrant shopping street could be demolished, while Ridley Road Market and a primary school would be hugely disrupted under plans to build an underground station for Crossrail 2 in Dalston.

Bid farewell to Christmas today, at the Geffrye Museum’s Twelfth Night event.

Friends and family of rock legend Marc Bolan need to raise £10,000 to build a stage and memorial garden in the playground of the school he attended as a child.

Two local authorities tonight gave a double slap in the face to London Mayor Boris Johnson over controversial plans to throw up a “Berlin Wall of bland blocks” of skyscrapers on the massive Bishopsgate goodsyard site.

Planning committees at Tower Hamlets and Hackney meeting simultaneously rejected the £800 million scheme for the derelict rail terminal and sidings.

The rebellion across east London against the controversial Bishopsgate goods yard development comes to a head tonight with both Tower Hamlets and neighbouring Hackney councils set to reject the £800 million scheme.

Early music and seasonal Christmas music are set to keep audiences spellbound for the next 12 days when this year’s Spitalfields Music Winter Festival opens today in London’s East End.

It features a wealth of early music, festival debuts from renowned European ensembles, premieres, exclusive works-in-progress, family-orientated concerts and activities and seasonal music from some of the country’s most popular ensembles.

Rooms have been decorated in the style of Christmases past at the Geffrye Museum.

£1m works to upgrade the 750-capacity assembly hall at Shoreditch Town Hall are now complete.

A-List associates of ‘The Firm’ and crime fans from all over the country turned a Krays’ charity fundraiser at Whitechapel’s Blind Beggar pub into a ‘Kraysy’ rush for memorabilia of the notorious gangster family who ruled gangland from London’s East End.

Ex-Page 3 tabloid pin-up Maureen Flanagan, now in her 70s and running a charity shop in South Hackney, staged the memorabilia fair at the pub where Ronnie Kray shot dead rival gangster George Cornell in 1966.

One of the henchmen who “tidied up” for the Kray mobsters in London’s East End in the 1960s returns to the Blind Beggar pub tomorrow—scene of one of their notorious gangland executions—to squeeze some cash for his worthy cause.

Two outspoken mayors are joining forces for a major “conference of the people” in an 11th hour bid to stop east London’s controversial Bishopsgate railway goods-yard development getting the green light.

Both Tower Hamlets mayor John Biggs and neighbouring Hackney’s Jules Pipe are addressing the conference at Shoreditch St Leonard’s Church on November 16.

A vast green space first laid out by Victorian town planners as London’s “fresh air lungs” to stop industrial expansion swallowing up what remained of open countryside east of The City has been voted People’s Choice as Britain’s favourite public open space yet again.

An emotional centenary commemoration of nurse Edith Cavell’s execution in German-occupied Belgium during the First World War has been held in London this week with hundreds of observers.

The stalwart nurse was put in front of a German firing squad after Belgium, where she was working, had been invaded and occupied. Her crime: helping Allied soldiers escape who were trapped behind enemy lines.

A battle for the heart of east London has now switched to City Hall in a manoeuvre to get Boris Johnson to push through the controversial Bishopsgate goodsyard development before he steps down as Mayor of London next May.

A group which wants to bring a derelict Victorian swimming pool back into use has called a public meeting to discuss other possible uses for the building put forward to Hackney Council by potential lease holders - which include a brewery, a theatre, a hotel, a nightclub - along with a bid to retain the pool.

Don’t see Legend if you don’t want to be drawn into a realistic portrayal of the Krays, the ruthless top dogs of east London’s violent underworld of the 1960s.

Two Hackney boozers are amongst 19 recognised nationally as shining examples of the inter-war years, when pubs were made bigger and better to leave behind an image of ‘drunkenness’ to attract more respectable customers including families and women.

The tragic wife of notorious gangster Reggie Kray who took her own life after walking out on him had electric shock treatment in Hackney Hospital which helped erase memories of their doomed marriage, a book out on Thursday reveals in the run-up to next week’s Legend movie about the Krays.

Hundreds of protesters are to join hands to form a human chain encircling historic buildings at Norton Folgate next to London’s famous Spitalfields Market in a campaign to stop developers demolishing a huge swathe of the unique Georgian neighbourhood.

A pub - The Chesham Arms - which would have been turned into flats if regulars hadn’t mounted a two-year campaign to save it, has opened to the public.

A troupe of actors are taking over the gardens of east London’s famous Geffrye Museum for three nights to stage a play written for the Twelfth Night of Christmas by an up-and-coming dramatist living in area for a while.

Residents have been celebrating this week as a popular Homerton pub became the second in the borough to be awarded council planning protection.

A new plaque commemorating the first bombing raid over London during the First World War has been unveiled in Stoke Newington.

Bingo players in Hoxton are heartbroken at the closure of their club which they say is like a “family”.

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