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Yesterday, 18:24

Police were cracking down on the “drugs-related dance craze”, acid house, the Gazette reported 30 years ago.

The Gazette let off steam in a rant about youngsters going around asking for a “penny for the guy”.

For a generation of people surrounded by dereliction, isolation and squalor, there were places of artistic salvation – and it brought together the vibrant and eclectic Hoxton community.

Britain’s answer to Marilyn Monroe stopped traffic and fought her way through 1,500 yelling, pushing and scrambling school kids as she opened a new furniture shop in Mare Street. 
Sabrina, a 50s pin-up whose real name was Norma Ann Sykes, achieved fame for her 41 inch chest and 18-inch waist.

It’s 60 years since the Gazette moved its staff – and its printing presses – into a newly built premises in Kingsland Road. Today, it’s the HQ for Christian group Congress Global Breakthrough Network. From what is now the paper’s Newington Green office, Emma Bartholomew looks back

Shoreditch’s first ever week-long carnival came to an end when over 3,000 people who had crowded into Hoxton Street saw the Mayor Cllr Robert Tallantire cut the first slice from a pig sizzling over a barbecue at a bomb site.

A 13-year-old who won a competition to come up with a flag for Black history month has seen her winning design hoisted above the Town Hall.

A Caribbean tea party gave the Windrush generation in Hackney the chance to celebrate their achievements, and saw a sing-along to “Swing low”, chats with old friends and rum punch all round.

A scrap of unused public land in south Hackney could soon be transformed into a hang-out area for all ages by children who live nearby.

Entertainers who run tots’ classes in Clissold House have complained a new pram ban there will threaten their livelihoods.

The Gazette pre-warned readers about an upcoming emergency planning exercise, in which a plane “will be imagined to have crashed” on the Stonebridge Estate in Clarissa Street, Haggerston.

The watchdog for local government finance launched an investigation into why a council worker had been paid £56,000 to do absolutely nothing for four whole years

Drumming legend Jah Bunny tells Emma Bartholomew how meeting his idol as a teenager in Jamaica has stuck with him for the whole of his life. Now aged 69 his story is included in an upcoming Hackney Museum exhibition about how Black musicians have influenced the borough’s cultural scene

The name Kench Hill may not mean much to Hackney’s newcomers, but it might strike a chord with anyone who grew up here.

Parishioners joined faith and civic leaders on a canal barge yesterday to get the Bishop of Stepney’s official blessing for their new Hackney Wick community.

Plans have been submitted to demolish the front of the historic Clapton Tram Depot site and build two industrial units adjoining the existing sheds.

Emma Bartholomew hears from John Tomaszewski, 94, who is possibly the last remaining survivor who lived in Dalston’s German Orphanage. He recounts how it was closed down by the British government after a teacher was rumbled recruiting boy scouts for the Hitler Youth Movement

Two teenagers from Hoxton were accused of murdering Alan Henry Compton at a dance at the Wenlock Manor Hall.

The Hackney Kestrels speedway stars skidded into controversy over apartheid after three of the members were said to be considering places on a tour of South Africa.

​Children’s author Heather Maisner was just three when she moved into a prefab home in Homerton. She tells Emma Bartholomew about the fond memories she has of community life and a happy childhood there

A magistrate said he would have “no gang warfare in this area” and vowed to dish out the maximum penalties to any youths who came before him charged with GBH.

Thousands of angry council tenants are threatening a rent strike over the poor standard of cleaning on their estates.

This weekend, TfL is celebrating the half-century of the Victoria line. Ahead of that celebration, we spoke to the transport body’s former heritage chief, Mike Ashworth, for the lowdown on its origins.

An appeal has been launched to find family members of a Stoke Newington soldier who died in battle during the First World War.

A young barman who nicked £480 from his employers at The Flower Pot in Tottenham and embarked on a spending spree to “start a new life” was jailed for two weeks.

Hackney’s rubbish collection service was thrown into chaos with a new union deal that halved the number of dustcarts.

The V&A will move its collection and research centre into a “world class” new facility at the Olympic Park.

Police demanded to speak to everyone who attended a dance at Wenlock Manor in Cropley Street, Hoxton, where 18-year-old Dalston man Alan Compton was stabbed to death.

A commuter who was arrested for trying to prevent a potential Tube tragedy walked free from court and vowed to sue the police who put him in the cells.

Tributes have been paid to Betty Shanks, the former Queensbridge councillor and mayor who has died aged 88.

The beloved London Fields Flower Sellers statue has been restored to its former glory after 30 years of exposure to the elements.

Two children were killed in a pub fire 15 years ago which left two others with horrendous burns. One of the survivors Vicky Knight tells Emma Bartholomew about its impact and how starring in a film helped overcome at least some of the trauma

Hackney is the first council to officially oppose the criminalisation of Windrush familes, celebrate Windrush Day and call for a public enquiry into the scandal.

A former Arsenal and Scotland footballer became the licensee at The Greyhound pub in Balls Pond Road.

Police blamed greedy shopkeepers for the death of 16-year-old solvent sniffer Calvin Radleigh, and set up a special hotline to trap them.

Erkin Güney, whose father founded Masjid Ramadan, the first Turkish mosque in the UK, speaks to Emma Bartholomew about his father’s ambitious and successful conversion of the abandoned synagogue in 1977

A rare Jewish festival which only takes place every 28 years takes centre stage in photographer Neil Martinson’s new booklet. Emma Bartholomew chats to him about his work and his memories of the sun festival Birkat Hachama, which took place in Stamford Hill in 1981

Campaigners have been working around the clock to save a historic Grade-II listed building in Lower Clapton, but it’s now been sold for £460,000.

A historic Newington Green building that has been home to radical thinking for more than 300 years will be given a vital £1.7million restoration.

N’Goma Bishop knows a thing or two about community campaigning.

Until the Clean Air Act 1956, coal was used to heat homes and was delivered to cellars through a hole outside front doors or pavements.

Kelly McLean wants to reveal a different side to her dad in her debut book after learning more about her own mental health

Campaigners are in a race against time to “save” a derelict Grade-II listed school building in Lower Clapton before it sells at auction.

Listed Victorian buildings in Kingsland High Street are no longer under threat from Crossrail 2, the Gazette can reveal.

Hackney’s Caribbean elders came together to celebrate the 70th anniversary of MV Empire Windrush docking in Britain.

Ronald Gibson’s photography studio was “the place to go” if you wanted to get a photo taken in the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s.

As the Gazette’s environment correspondent Will McCallum, who works for Greenpeace, publishes a book about ‘How to give up Plastic’, Emma Bartholomew looks back to where the problem first began - at the world’s first ever plastic factory in Hackney Wick, set up by Alexander Parkes.

A pigeon fancier claimed he found seven of his stolen birds on sale in a livestock shop, this week 60 years ago.

A mystery plague of flies was making life miserable for Pembury Estate tenants.

A display in Hackney town hall’s newly refurbished vaults will shed light on the building’s 1930s origins, and the amazing relics unearthed during its £16m revamp. Emma Bartholomew speaks to curator Jacoba Mijnssen about democracy, regalia, and the mysterious cleaning unit uncovered by workers

Jodhi May became the youngest ever recipient of the best actress award at the Cannes Film Festival, aged 12.

As the Kingsland Waste market is about to relaunch in July, Emma Bartholomew looks back at the market which started out as a tool market over a century ago, where you could buy TV sets that “never worked” and a man called Flash would sell the latest in gingham shirts

As Meghan and Harry prepare to get hitched, Emma Bartholomew looks back at how Hackney celebrated his mum and dad’s royal nuptials, with street parties, majorettes – and an anti-monarchist festival in Clissold Park that was delicately called Funk The Wedding

When Marsh Hill News opened, the regular customers came from the Lesney Products Matchbox factory, the words artisan coffee had never been uttered and the Olympics were something that took place on the telly. A lot has changed since 1978, as Jan Patel told the Gazette ahead of next month’s anniversary.

Seats sold out for a two-hour keep-fit performance by the Stoke Newington’s Women’s Institute.

Martin Goodrich tells the Gazette about the mural he helped create in Daubeney Road – which could be given protected status if campaigners get their way.

The 59 Club was the world’s most famous biker club in the 1960s at the height of the rocker scene. It all started in a Hackney Wick church, and now it’s going back. The Gazette spoke to the man behind the revival.

A film about former East End gangster and Kray twin hitman Fred Forman has been had its premiere screening at the East End Film Festival. Fred, now a reformed character, tells Emma Bartholomew about being a ‘respectable’ criminal and the 1983 Shoreditch Security Express heist.

A Dalston vicar asked parishioners to send him postcards stating what they thought about prison sentences.

The battle is on to save a Stoke Newington RAF cadets squadron after armed forces chiefs announced it was being shut next month after 77 years.

Homerton’s Toe Rag Studios is 20 this year. It’s best known for being the studio where The White Stripes recorded Grammy-award winning album Elephant. The Gazette dropped in for a chat with owner Liam Watston.

A group of heritage enthusiasts will embark on a walking tour of the NE postcode area – but not the one up north.

Reggae pioneer and co-founder of Dalston’s legendary Four Aces Club Charlie Collins, aka Sir Collins, has died aged 81.

The man accused of murdering “Father Christmas” appeared in court this week 60 years ago.

Emma Bartholomew discovers how a boxing match between two women sparked outrage in Hackney 90 years ago – with the mayor blasting the idea as ‘gratification of the sensual ideas of a crowd of vulgar men’, and the home secretary lamenting his inability to step in

Tory Environment Secretary Nicholas Ridley ordered the closure of Hackney Council’s house building department.

Tory and Labour councillors were furious that “hard-up” Hackney Council was planning to give a £150,000 gift to buy the Hackney Empire from bingo giant Mecca.

Lavinia Co-op travelled the world as part of radical drag troupe Bloolips and performed at venues from Jackson’s Lane to the Empire. As photos and memorabilia from the group’s remarkable past go on show at Hackney Museum, he tells Emma Bartholomew his story

A woman who found a burglar in her home gave him a meal before calling the police.

Policemen had to hold back the crowds as the winner of several beauty contests, Gina Hickey, wed Thomas Heslop at St Mark’s Church in Dalston.

Publishing stalwart Gillian Harris tells Emma Bartholomew how she co-founded Letterbox Library in Hackney 35 years ago – after looking at her daughter’s shelf and being shocked by what she saw. Her goal? To promote books about equality, feminism, strong girls and ‘gentle, caring boys’

”That place on Hackney Downs is constantly being broken into,” a judge noted after three teens admitted breaking and entering at a refreshments hut and stealing sweets, biscuits and a clock worth £9.

The newly re-launched Far Eastern community centre in De Beauvoir could be turned into an Asian version of Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen, a leading Chinatown restaurateur has revealed.

Custom-made wallpaper is now on show at Hackney Museum for LGBT history month. It’s inspired by the experiences of older queer people – and the prejudice they still face 51 years on from the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality in the UK. The Gazette speaks to two of them

Coco the Clown visited children at the Super Cinema juniors’ club to give them a lesson in road safety.

When Auro Foxcroft first walked into forgotten Art Deco gem the Savoy Cinema two years ago it was covered in pigeon poo, cobwebs and piles of junk.

The project to transform Stoke Newington’s derelict ABC Cinema into a new venue known as the Hackney Arts Centre has received £1.9million in funding.

Women in Hackney were shaping public opinion way before their rights were recognised in Parliament. The Gazette finds out about the remarkable journalist Olive Malvery who went undercover to expose appalling conditions of workers at the turn of the 20th century.

Hackney Downs School cancelled its subscription to The Beezer comic, because of its “racist” new character – True Brit.

Born and bred in Hackney, Neil Martinson captured a period of the borough’s working class history on film. While some things have changed, like the Matchbox factory’s closure in 1981, others – like the pressure on housing services – haven’t. 
He tells Emma Bartholomew his story

Manfred Goldberg used to be unable to discuss the traumatic experiences he endured in five Nazi concentration camps.

Typewriters were a thing of the past as “new technology” was introduced at the Gazette newsroom.

The death of Rashan Charles, and its aftermath, has tragic echoes of the case of Colin Roach. The 21-year-old was shot inside Stoke Newington police station 35 years ago, with the community convinced cops had a hand. Poet Benjamin Zephaniah was at the first protest after his death, he tells the Gazette.

A cafe owner was accused of “diabolical mental cruelty” by a magistrate for playing music full blast on his record player until 10.45pm.

Emma Bartholomew catches up with Marcia Linch, whose parents set up the Clapton Beauty Parlour 88 years ago. Their clients included Barbara Windsor – who refused to clean up after her dog

A 15-year-old boy from Clapton stole his aunt’s life savings of £32 and used them to fund an international trip.

This week marks 15 years since the bloody culmination of a two-week siege that ground a Hackney street to a halt. The Gazette looks through the archive and speaks to those who played major roles in the drama to find out what they remember about January 2003 in Graham Road.

The Hoxton man credited with saving a Hampshire village from destruction by diverting a wayward tank was given a certificate for his bravery.

A musical about rival Victorian girl gangs links in with the music hall history of Hoxton Hall, where it is set. Emma Bartholomew finds out more about the women behind the Forty Elephants – a notorious gang that was driven to shoplift and pickpocket because of the extreme poverty its members faced

A 12-year-old from Stamford Hill was dubbed the rising young star of television.

Former Hackney councillor, activist and “great bloke” Cam Matheson has died at 75.

Hackney’s Tree Musketeers tell Emma Bartholomew about the 20 years they spent transforming parks by planting hundreds of trees - and the logistics involved in watering them afterwards

“Pinball Geoff” Harvey loves pinball so much that as a teenager he gave up his bed so he could have more machines in his room.

A gun shop sited near two schools and a sweetshop used by children was given permission to stay open despite massive protests from parents, teachers, councillors and MPs.

Wayne Asher tells Emma Bartholomew about the ‘lunatic’ ring road scheme that threatened to plough an eight-lane motorway through Hackney – and was only scrapped after 30 years of destroying the local property market

Stoke Newington Bobby Pc Clifford Fox embarked on a journey to discover the tales behind the deaths of six policemen buried in Abney Park Cemetery – but the story of one eluded him for months. Now, thanks to his efforts, Pc Richard Lillicrap will be given a proper headstone, reports Emma Bartholomew.

Flames were 50 feet high as 80 firemen battled a blaze in a kitchen cabinet makers’ in the heart of Shoreditch.

Free holidays for pensioners were stopped by Hackney Council to save money, the Gazette reported.

Not long after TV celebrity Bob Monkhouse was mobbed at the anniversary celebrations at Ridley Road Market, he was mobbed yet again – this time at the opening of a shop in Bethnal Green Road.

Potter and BBC Great Pottery Thrown Down judge Kate Malone is inviting the public into her De Beauvoir studio this weekend – for the last time before she moves out. The Gazette finds out about the three decades she has spent living and working there.

Hackney Council has rubber stamped a plan to refurbish and redevelop the Haggerston Baths building into shops, community spaces and offices.

The fate of Haggerston Baths will be decided on Monday after a consultation found most people would rather see it turned into shops than a hotel.

A journalist was forced to drive into London at gunpoint after picking up two boys who had escaped from a borstal.

Carolyn Clark tells Emma Bartholomew about her book, The Lower Clapton Tales, which recounts the past century of what used to be known as Clop-Ton.

To mark what would have been her 100th birthday, the son of Betty Layward tells Emma Bartholomew how proud the veteran governor she would have been to have a school named after her.

It’s exactly 100 years since one Hackney teenager was killed in the battle of Beersheba. Emma Bartholomew speaks to his nephew ahead of Remembrance Day, remembering those who fought and gave their lives

A new exhibition at an art shop in Kingsland Road will celebrate the craft of glassmaking that began on the same spot more than a century ago – and continued until the turn of the millennium. The Gazette speaks to a pair of glass makers who once worked in the studio about why it was so special.

A former plastic works, cardboard factory and printing press in Hackney Wick is on course to be transformed into a hub for beer lovers.

A “kitchen champion” is being sought as part of plans to turn a dilapidated toilet block into a thriving community café.

The former editor of the Gazette - who was also a famous ventriloquist - died aged 95.

To mark the centenary of the October Revolution, the Gazette looks back at a “way-out” church in De Beauvoir that hosted Lenin, Stalin and Trotsky for a crucial conference – and put the Bolsheviks on the road to power.

This week marks the 30th anniversary of the Great Storm of 1987. Emma Bartholomew catches up with a former Gazette reporter, still chuffed his photo of the aftermath made it onto the front page that week

The gay and transgender community have won Tower Hamlets Council’s green light for a new venue on the site of the Joiners’ Arms that was shut down in 2015.

Lower Clapton woman Evadne Gordon is celebrating becoming the longest serving female member of the Royal Naval Reserves.

The old Passing Clouds venue could reopen as a music spot after plans were submitted by the landlord – complete with an extra storey on the roof.

Tim Smith speaks to Emma Bartholomew about his father’s photos of the Caribbean – a window into a world that no longer exists, which he believes will stir up memories for migrants who moved to Hackney decades ago

“Eastenders are renowned for droppig their H’s, but whoever painted this sign outside Haggerston School was taking it too far,” the Gazette joked.

Wondering what the weather has in store for us this weekend? Watch our two-minute Met Office video forecast.

The Hackney Society was born 50 years ago to preserve the borough’s history. But a hefty book marking its half-century proves there’s more to heritage than old buildings. Emma Bartholomew, one of the tome’s authors, reports on its launch.

A derelict mansion in Stoke Newington could finally be brought back into use after the council announced plans to redevelop the site.

It’s 50 years since the Sexual Offences Act partially decriminalised gay sex. To mark the anniversary, Kat Hudson is curating an exhibition at Sutton House on the queer nightlife scene in Hackney and beyond. She tells Emma Bartholomew about the ‘golden age’ – and whether those really were the days

The Abney Park Trust is celebrating the bicentenary of William Hones’ victorious court battle against government censorship in 1817. It marked a turning point in the fight for the freedom of Britain’s press. Emma Bartholomew finds out more.

“I was always a star, even if it was only being the star of three streets in Hackney,” Marc Bolan reportedly used to quip.

Some of Hackney’s most fascinating buildings are open to the public for free tours this weekend.

Hackney is awash with microbreweries nowadays, but it wasn’t always that way. Emma Bartholomew catches up with the trailblazers from Pitfield Brewery who set off the craze for craft beer more than 30 years ago

Protesters against ‘Brexit’ from all over east London join tomorrow’s ‘People’s March for Europe’ and mass rally in Westminster.

As the owners of Springfield House look for permission to replace all its windows, Emma Bartholomew looks back to 1902 when a trailblazer in fire prevention, Edwin Sachs, designed it

If Finsbury Park held a music festival with all the acts to have performed in the N4 postcode area, it would be the greatest gig of all time.

Charity collection boxes featuring Noddy figures were booted out of Hackney’s libraries to make way for collection boxes for the mayor’s own charity – but she had not yet chosen one.

Neighbours of the Geffrye Museum have objected to money-making plans to serve booze in its grounds and Grade I-listed building every day – and say a licence should not be granted if London’s inaugural “rosé festival” was anything to go by.

Theatre historian Matthew Neil introduces the Gazette to Nelly Power – the “forgotten” Victorian music hall, burlesque and panto star whose name will soon be familiar to anyone walking past 97 Southgate Road.

Sixty-five years ago, Stoke Newington’s last tram pulled away. The Gazette spoke to readers who remember the horse-drawn – and later electric – vehicles that ran down Green Lanes and connected Hackney to the rest of north London.

The legendary producer who was behind the desk when some of the greatest pop albums of the last 35 years were recorded used to shop in Ridley Road Market.

Abney Park Chapel has reopened to the public after a huge renovation project restored the 19th century Gothic mortuary to its former glory.

A man is trying to track down the stranger who saved his life 54 years ago when he was drowning in the Finsbury Park boating pond.

Wondering what the weather has in store for us this weekend? Watch our three-minute Met Office video forecast.

Outside Finsbury Park Post Office on a Saturday morning, a group of union activists are campaigning. They are asking people to make a pledge. A pledge not to buy stationery.

Simon Mooney’s photographs juxtapose Hackney’s history with modern life. He tells the Gazette abut his exhibition of 50 pictures to mark the first half-century of the Hackney Society – a heritage group that has fought since 1967 to preserve the borough’s history in the face of development.

The refurbished town hall contains a corridor hung with more than a hundred photographs. They show Hackney’s mayors and speakers since 1900. Guided by the head of the modern-day mayor’s office Abbas Panjwani hears some of the best – and strangest – stories that lie behind Hackney’s civic chains.

The Gazette finds out about the history tours John Baldock leads around Abney Park – and the characters buried in the Stoke Newington cemetery.

Shoreditch police station could face the axe amid £400million cost-cutting plans for the Met.

Neil Martinson was 19 when he designed and put up posters about the 1973 Chilean coup around Hackney. Forty-four years on, the only surviving copy is at the museum. Emma Bartholomew explains.

Hackney Council included pages from its controversial freesheet Hackney Today in a time capsule – but ditched a cutting from the Hackney Gazette at the last minute due to “lack of space”.

An East End bobby caught a landlord and a lorry driver drinking after hours when he peered through the frosted glass window of a Bethnal Green boozer.

A family cheated death when their cornershop was reduced to rubble with them inside.

Emma Bartholomew speaks to Rob Harries from charity WORLDwrite about its film on CLR James – a revolutionary he believes has fallen under the radar, despite the enormous library that bears his name

Riaz Phillips tells Valeria Fiore how his search for the best Caribbean cooking led him full circle to Hackney, where his grandmother lived for 60 years.

Hoxton Market celebrated 330 years of trading on Saturday with a relaunch. Emma Bartholomew speaks to traders at the East End market that is older than the USA.

Nell James Grace from Queer Tours of London speaks to Emma Bartholomew about the tour she is hosting this weekend as part of Pride 365 – Hackney’s year-long celebration of the borough’s LGBTQI+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, intersex) community.

A rainbow flag will fly over Hackney Town Hall from next month to mark the launch of a year-long gay pride celebration.

Major plans to redevelop the old ABC Cinema in Stoke Newington Road will go before councillors on Tuesday – with developers insisting it will be good for Dalston’s struggling arts venues.

Ron Miller, 85, fought in the Korean War aged just 18, and has been ‘living bravely with his war wounds’ ever since. Emma Bartholomew recounts his story of the ‘forgotten war’.

DNA testing in a school may sound like a Jeremy Kyle-esque disaster waiting to happen, but no punches were thrown at Southwold Primary in Clapton.

Crowdfunding for £150,000 to revamp the “shabby” front of Dalston’s Rio cinema and build a second screen in its basement is set to officially launch next Friday – a year later than initially planned.

A “once-in-a-lifetime” school reunion saw scores of old Amherst Primary pupils gather for a knees-up in Old Street.

The Working Women’s Bus Tour is the fourth and final instalment of A Hackney Autobiography, which contains audio tours inspired by the bookshop and publisher Centerprise. Emma Bartholomew reports.

A decision is set to be made on the controversial luxury housing development on site of the old bingo hall in Hackney Road.

Emma Bartholomew finds out more about the not-very-well documented history of Ridley Road Market after coming across a Gazette article dating back 60 years to its 30th birthday – give or take

The Gazette finds out more about Dr Jelley, who treated Hackney’s poor before the advent of the NHS – and recommended to some that they go to the pub on Friday nights.

Bad tempered pigs, circus elephants, children playing on the streets and women sitting on their porches shelling peas – these were all part of everyday life in a legendary tight-knit community where you had to pay a toll and hop over someone’s back wall to get in.

A prolific activist’s tale of fighting fascists with the 43 Group after the Second World War is brought to life in an audio walk about Hackney’s different ‘frontlines’. Emma Bartholomew reports

An app will bring tales of resistance and equality in Hackney to life – courtesy of Dalston’s radical bookshop. Emma Bartholomew reports

Alan Denney has been photographing our borough since 1976. He talks Emma Bartholomew through five that are close to his heart.

Historian Prof Ged Martin documents the rise and fall of sootigine, a cheap and, as it turned out, pretty damaging fertiliser made in Hackney Downs in the 1880s.

The chairman of one of the most famous Sunday leagues in the world has launched a scathing attack on the FA, David Beckham and green campaigners.

Campaigners have welcomed the decision to defer a controversial luxury housing development on the site of the old bingo hall in Hackney Road.

Hackney could soon be getting another of its old cinemas back. Auro Foxcroft, the man behind Shoreditch spot Village Underground, wants to dust off the seats of the old ABC and Savoy cinema. We had a chat with him

The Geffrye has secured £12m towards its £15m revamp, which is set to open up previously unexplored parts of the museum of the home.

As the consultation on Haggerston Baths’ decidedly dry future kicks off, the Gazette looks back at the pool’s 114-year history.

Meet the raggedy band of volunteers who spend their spare time keeping hotshot developers in line. The Gazette caught up with members of Hackney’s Conservation Area Advisory Committees to find out what they do.

Andrew Holligan captured life in Dalston three decades ago on a 1950s camera. He shares his snaps – and explains how the project came about.

Every week the Gazette will delve into its archives to see what was happening in Hackney 30 and 60 years ago.

Sam Roberts has spent years hunting down old adverts painted on Hackney’s buildings. He tells the Gazette about his love for “ghost signs”.

A “micro-hotel” and a shopping centre are among the final plans for Haggerston Baths – and now the town hall wants to know what you think.

As his photographs of the Holly Street estate go on show, Tom Hunter tells The Gazette about life on the 18th floor

Zeka Alsancak and his fellow Turkish Cypriots set up a community centre in Hackney 40 years ago. The Gazette joins him looking back

The Gazette speaks to filmmaker Derek Smith, whose chance discovery of a photo has led to the creation of a whole museum exhibition about the estate where he lives

The Gazette discovers the history of the Hackney associations that were infiltrated by police during the late 1990s.

Campaigners have won their battle to stop Sainsbury’s opening a Local store in the old Highbury Vale police station.

Entertainer Len Belmont tells us how life as one of the country’s top ventriloquist and magic acts landed him a job on C4 show TFI Friday.

Hackney Museum wants to right a wrong: it doesn’t have enough gay history in its archive. Emma Bartholomew reports on the launch of a project to change that.

Harvey Waterman, now 80, tells Emma Bartholomew about his youth in the mental institution he was sent to age four

Aviva’s bid to tap into the trendiness of Hoxton has been savaged by historians and neighbours – who are concerned they will turn the “historic home of the Hackney artist” into a “corporate playground”.

A book will be published this year to mark 50 years of the Hackney Society. Emma Bartholomew looks back in time at its creation in 1967

The Gazette looks back at the history of Britannia Leisure Centre – which is at risk of demolition if council plans come to fruition.

You’ve probably walked past these buildings – and ignored them – dozens of times. But photographer Simon Phipps feels it’s time we started to celebrate the post-war brutalist architecture that is all over the capital.

The Rio is launching a campaign this year to restore the Art Deco picture palace to its former glory. Emma Bartholomew looks back at its past century.

A campaign has been launched to give a Stoke Newington pub protected status over fears it could become yet another restaurant.

A historian who knows more about Stoke Newington than most has decided to share his archives with, well, the whole world.

Reporter Emma Bartholomew speaks to Peter the Pleater, who is leaving his eponymous Shoreditch premises - 34 years after setting up shop there

The Rochester Castle has been a popular Stoke Newington boozer for centuries. We delved into its past (and discovered its nickname among regulars)

St Augustine’s Tower is the only grotto in Hackney over 500 years old. Emma Bartholomew hears from Laurie Elks about its history as a social, sacred and political landmark.

Eithne Nightingale, a writer, photographer and researcher has been studying child migration to the East End for more than 10 years. Now, she and producer Mitch Harris have made films documenting the incredible journeys made by three children to Hackney.

Finsbury Park’s running track has endured a troubled recent history. But years of hard work mean our athletics clubs have an exciting future, the Gazette hears.

It’s important to the life of the theatre, and key to its survival and growth. Susie McKenna chats with The Gazette about the history of panto at the Empire

Mayor of Hackney Philip Glanville held his own against former Newsnight presenter Jeremy Paxman, when the abrasive interviewer tried to insinuate he wasn’t in touch with his electorate.

Students at The Urswick School, Paragon Road, marked Armistice Day with a special service on Friday morning.

Hackney residents joined ex-service men and women to remember the fallen at the borough’s Remembrance Sunday parade and church service on Sunday,

As Stoke Newington Methodist Church marks its double centenary, Emma Bartholomew hears about some of its longest-serving players

It may have lasted just nine months, but the 1968 Antiuniversity’s legacy has endured. Sam Gelder got educated on the radical project – and its revival

Emma Bartholomew meets the Andersons as the family wind down their 160-year-old Hoxton bakery firm

Campaigners for Dalston music venue Passing Clouds will have the chance to buy the building after it was given protected status by Hackney Council.

Newington Green Unitarian Church is in desperate need of repair. Nothing unusual there. What sets it apart, finds James Morris, are the 300 years of radical history witnessed by its crumbling walls.

Emma Bartholomew meets author Patrick Wiegand, whose grandparents ran an orphanage in Dalston – for Germans

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