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Theatre

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Nearly £750,000 has been awarded to the two venues by Arts Council England to fund new seating and upgrade performance and foyer spaces

This is a gloriously happy, funny and moving play.

Zawe Ashton is better known as an actress - she's currently on Broadway in Pinter's Betrayal. For All the Women Who Thought They Were Mad, her eerie second play, was written over a decade ago but is only now finally brought to life in a production by Jo McInnes.

"This is a piece of Hackney's own history that we are giving back to its people," says Dan Dawes, co-founder of the Idle Discourse theatre company.

The Glory pub in Haggerston is heaving with people eager to grab the seats behind the judges of the Gold Rush competition to witness some of the rawest and most innovative drag performances in London.

Radio 1 DJ Greg James, English cricket icon Jimmy Anderson and ex-Maccabees guitarist Felix White bring their Tailenders podcast to Hackney Empire this Sunday (Oct 13) for a rare live outing.

A playwright who lived on the Woodberry Down Estate before its regeneration has written a new comedy based on London's housing crisis.

A seven course tasting menu and a poignant drama of loss and migration offer food for thought

Jessica Lazar's one-act piece plunges viewers in to a terrifying and beautiful world of night-time horrors and fairytale fiction.

Based on the fatal shooting af a black teen by a white policeman, Dael Orlandersmith performs her own devastating poetic monologues which spotlight the racism that divides and distorts America

"We're giving people permission to feel uncomfortable," says American playwright Dael Orlandersmith of Until The Flood, which addresses the 2014 shooting of African-American teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, by white policer officer Darren Wilson - igniting Black Lives Matter-propelled social unrest.

Al Smith's one-man play about an all-American boy who dreams of taking part in the moon landing was first seen in 2006.

Career ambitions clash with family life in Chasing Rainbows, a new play from Oneness Sankara running at Hoxton Hall from June 25 to July 20.

Trying to unpick the qualities that have elevated Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie to the status of fabled modern classic is a tricky exercise.

2018 will go down as one of the most important years in the history of The Tower Theatre Company.

Road trips have long been adopted as a metaphor to convey the lessons that can be learned over the course of a life. Well-worn to the point of cliché, however, it is not easy for fresh shades to fill such tired etchings.

Two years ago Elliot Warren was performing his debut play in front of two or three people a night. Now he's won an Olivier Award for it.

More than a century after the stars of music hall graced its stage, the Rosemary Branch Tavern on the Regent's Canal is bringing it back for two special nights.

Gloriously silly reworking of Moliere's Tartuffe stutters with an inconsistent tone but comes good at the end to lampoon Britain's crumbling social structures

Have you ever been so deep in to a box-set binge that Netflix has checked in to politely ask if you're still watching? The 50-Hour Improvathon, which comes to Wilton's Music Hall next weekend, is kind of like the live version.

"It's a real collision of light and dark, where subjects so far apart all somehow come together." After two years of development, producer Jacob Dorrell is about to unveil his new musical: The Cereal Café.

Scottish Opera's production of Anthropocene is the fourth show pieced together by composer Stuart MacRae and librettist Louise Welsh.

A new play written by Greg Wohead is about unlikely encounters and how we interact with people who share very different views of the world compared with our own.

'Don't be old, don't be young, don't be sick, don't be black,' is the brutal warning in Gabriel Gbadamosi's new play that seems to promise an exploration of police stop and search tactics but is actually a study of fractured lives in a world under permanent surveillance.

A high energy return to form for Susie McKenna's legendary annual outing of gliz, hilarity and joy

An inventive production of John Masefield's 30s fantasy children's novel needs more brutal editing to truly shine

Take a look at the production images of Hackney Empire's pantomime for 2018 - Aladdin - on now until Sunday January 6.

Jo Trew enjoys the latest offering from the Arcola Theatre, a fresh adaption of Mikhail Lermontov's 19th century novel.

Theatre Review: Bullet Tongue

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Vulnerable young people are given a voice to tell their own gutwrenching story of the terrifying exploitation of children to sell drugs.

One of the most popular pantomimes in London returns this Saturday for a landmark production written and directed by Susie McKenna.

Our complete guide to panto season in Hackney is here!

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