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Project launched to challenge the stigmas Hackney women face

PUBLISHED: 15:42 25 September 2020 | UPDATED: 15:42 25 September 2020

Ketchurah named the project after the word for older sister in Tamil, a language spoken in Sri Lanka where she was born. Picture: Erhan Korkman

Ketchurah named the project after the word for older sister in Tamil, a language spoken in Sri Lanka where she was born. Picture: Erhan Korkman

Erhan Korkman

A Hackney volunteer has launched a project to challenge the stigmas that women from all cultures and communities face.

The Akka project was launched earlier this month to collect stories about the stigmas that women from different cultures and communities face and,  to help advocate for important issues. Picture: Erhan KorkmanThe Akka project was launched earlier this month to collect stories about the stigmas that women from different cultures and communities face and, to help advocate for important issues. Picture: Erhan Korkman

In her quest to collect stories and learn about the lives of other south Asian women, Ketchurah Ravindren realised many other women, especially women of colour, were dealing with similar issues and shared experiences.

She launched the Akka project on September 10 at the Eastern Curve Garden in Dalston.

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The project leader said: “I wanted [the project] to be something for South Asian women, where I could create an archive of stories of south Asian women that live in Hackney. I was made aware that there currently isn’t anything for that group and I’m still doing that.

Ketchurah Ravindren set up the project, with help from Our Place Hackney, while volunteering during the coronavirus lockdown. Picture: Erhan KorkmanKetchurah Ravindren set up the project, with help from Our Place Hackney, while volunteering during the coronavirus lockdown. Picture: Erhan Korkman

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“But from the interviews I realised that some of the issues within our communities and certain cultural things apply to lots of other women and especially women of colour.”

“I wanted to create a women’s fair where we can educate each other on things that might be stigmas in our communities and what it’s like for people who identify as women.”

The project aims to support women advocating for important issues.

Ketchurah, who was born in Sri Lanka, named the project Akka, which means older sister in Tamil, one of several languages spoken in the south Asian island country.

She wanted to thank Our Place Hackney,a grassroots resident-led project facilitated by Volunteer Centre Hackney, for helping set up the project.

“I would have never been able to do this without Our Place,” she said.

To get involved email Akkahackney@gmail.com or follow the project on instagram @theakkaproject


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