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Haggerston police shooting: Tyrone Henry found not guilty of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life

PUBLISHED: 16:59 22 April 2016 | UPDATED: 17:46 22 April 2016

Tyrone Henry

Tyrone Henry

Archant

A man who fled armed police carrying a defective loaded pistol that was fired into a detective’s chest moments later has been sentenced to seven years in prison.

"Tyrone Henry may not have pulled the trigger of the gun that shot the officer, but had he not been in possession of the illegal firearm it would not have been on the streets."

DCI Kevin Baldwin

Tyrone Henry, 31, of Phoenix Close, Haggerston, was found not guilty of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life by jurors at the Old Bailey today, but had previously pleaded guilty to possession of a prohibited weapon.

During the two-week trial, the father-of-four claimed he only came into its possession so he could “sort out a beef” between his friends.

Henry jumped from a first-floor window of the home he shared with his pregnant social worker girlfriend, to evade police as they raided the flat looking for the weapon on October 15 last year.

He said he then picked up the gun – which he had “assumed was loaded” when it was delivered to his home the night before – from beneath his toddler son’s trolley where he had hidden it in the garden, and climbed over a roof “to get away from my missus’ house”.

The handgun which was in Tyrone Henry's possessionThe handgun which was in Tyrone Henry's possession

He was only wearing white socks as he ran with the gun under his arm “like a rugby ball” wrapped in a kitchen towel and Tesco carrier bag, chased by about 10 officers wearing body-mounted cameras, who tripped him up around the corner in Scriven Street.

Whilst he was apprehended by officers the gun went off and a detective from the Trident and Area Crime Command was hit by a bullet in his chest which came out of his body through his back.

The injured detective, who gave evidence at the inquest, was released from hospital the same day.

The gun should not have been capable of firing because the safety catch was found to be on when officers seized the weapon – but forensic examination later proved the gun was faulty.

DCI Kevin Baldwin, from the Met’s Trident and Area Crime Command, said: “Tyrone Henry may not have pulled the trigger of the gun that shot the officer, but had he not been in possession of the illegal firearm it would not have been on the streets.

“It was fortunate that no officers or members of the public were killed by the defective pistol.

“Trident works hard to arrest those who carry illegal guns on London’s streets and this incident highlights the dangers faced every day by officers who are committed to keeping the public safe.”


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