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Upper Clapton rapper Professor Green feared he would die in attack

PUBLISHED: 12:46 20 October 2010

Professor Green

Professor Green

Archant

Court hears star called mother and grandmother to say farewell.

"“I phoned my mother and my grandmother and I said goodbye, I had been stabbed in my neck,”"

Professor Green

HACKNEY rap star Professor Green told jurors he rang his mother to say goodbye after being stabbed in the neck with a bottle in a Shoreditch nightclub.

The rapper, 26, whose real name is Stephen Manderson and who grew up in the Northwold estate in Upper Clapton, told Snaresbrook Crown Court how he thought he would die following the attack in Cargo in May last year.

Anthony Jones, 25, of Ashdale House on the Woodberry Down estate, is accused of attacking the star who he accused of jostling a friend.

Mr Manderson said after the assault he sat on a kerb outside the club clutching his wound while phoning his family to bid them a final farewell.

"“There was a very, very warm feeling in my neck. I put my hand up and blood was everywhere.”"

Professor Green

“I phoned my mother and my grandmother and I said goodbye, I had been stabbed in my neck,” he told jurors.

Christopher Gillespie, prosecuting asked: “How were you actually feeling at this point?”

“I was scared having been cut in the neck,” said the singer.

“I know what happens when people tend to get cut in the neck.”

Mr Manderson said he was targeted again while outside in the street but was unable to identify his attacker.

“I got hit over the back of the head,” said Mr Manderson.

“At this point I didn’t see who hit me.”

He said the attacker screamed: “You’re dead you f****** p****, you’re f****** dead” but the man was pulled away.

Mr Manderson said he had earlier attended the Karaoke Box bar in Farringdon, central London, before arriving for an evening of ‘grime’ music at the Cargo club.

He told the court he drank three glasses of Jack Daniel’s whisky at the venue but had not been drunk.

“I was happy, really happy - one of my favourite DJs was playing,” said Mr Manderson.

“I was in a really good mood.”

But Mr Manderson said the evening took a nasty turn when he was accused of barging into a reveller.

“There was a girl who I had spoken to briefly who was walking towards the exit and I was walking to catch her up,” said Mr Manderson.

“As I was making my way there was a lot of people to my right and there were two people to my left.

“I said excuse me and I just moved past the person.

“I just put my hand on his shoulder as to not push past him.”

Then Mr Manderson was suddenly confronted by Jones who accused him of barging into a friend, the court heard.

“He told me that I had barged his mate,” said Mr Manderson.

He said Jones told him to shake his friend’s hand and say sorry, then snarled: “You’re a bad man, aren’t you? You’re the baddest man in here.”

“I stood my ground, I said: ‘I’m not a bad man and I’m not a p**** either’ and he backed off,” said Mr Manderson.

But minutes later Jones assaulted him.

“The mixed race man who I had had that argument came at me, came through the crowd,” said Mr Manderson.

“All I saw was a hand come up to my face and neck.

“It was his right hand.

“The first thing I knew of him having something in his hand was when it was in my neck.

“There was a very, very warm feeling in my neck.

“I put my hand up and blood was everywhere.”

The trial continues.


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