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London Fields schoolchildren redesign Hackney using LEGO bricks

PUBLISHED: 09:00 17 November 2020

This rendered state-of-the-art tech school features robot teachers, AI and digital classrooms designed to cater for those with disabilities and a cupcake classroom where students can perfect their baking skills. Picture: The LEGO Group`

This rendered state-of-the-art tech school features robot teachers, AI and digital classrooms designed to cater for those with disabilities and a cupcake classroom where students can perfect their baking skills. Picture: The LEGO Group`

The LEGO Group

Television presenter Reggie Yates challenged Hackney school children to re-imagine the world using LEGO bricks - leading to creative and colourful results.

This LEGO  brick built school features a teachers spa, gardens and a monster truck breaktime show for creative entertainment. Picture: The LEGO GroupThis LEGO brick built school features a teachers spa, gardens and a monster truck breaktime show for creative entertainment. Picture: The LEGO Group

Year 4 children from London Fields Primary School rebuilt the city around them using LEGO pieces. The children’s new neighbourhoods featured chocolate swimming pools and slides instead of stairs, as well as eco-taxis to transport residents between the floors of homes.

READ MORE: 48-year-old Hackney adventure playground wins award

When tasked with using their imaginations to create new buildings like schools, the young world builders made sure teachers could relax in spas while monster truck shows were planned twice a week for entertainment.

Architect and founder of DH Liberty, Dara Huang, then brought the children’s re-imagined LEGO world to life, making realistic renders which give a glimpse into the students’ creative minds.

An architect rendered the children's designs using lego bricks. Here a building was designed with workers' mental healtha nd wellbeing at its core including office dogs and rabbits, ttree terraces for peaceful lunch breaks and tramplines to get workers around. Picture: The LEGO GroupAn architect rendered the children's designs using lego bricks. Here a building was designed with workers' mental healtha nd wellbeing at its core including office dogs and rabbits, ttree terraces for peaceful lunch breaks and tramplines to get workers around. Picture: The LEGO Group

She said: “Seeing the brick builds the children created really opened my eyes to the amazing creative solutions they naturally come up with, and how that thinking can be applied to the real world.

“With my own work, I feel inspired to think differently and with fewer barriers or constraints.”

The LEGO builds saw indoor and rooftop gardens installed into offices to bring nature to urban spaces, encourage wildlife and enhance mindfulness.

Pupils also incorporated innovative energy solutions into their creations such as solar panels and mechanisms to collect rainwater for more sustainable living.

READ MORE: Schoolchildren build bridges at the Olympic Park

LEGO play agent David Pallash, who led the workshop, said: “This session and exercise was a great way of encapsulating what the Rebuild the World campaign stands for, which is to celebrate kids’ creativity and challenge adults to see the world through children’s eyes.

“They have a unique, playful outlook and the ability to make the world a little brighter. Without the inhibitions of social norms, logic and social aspects such as status in society, a child’s thinking is fearless.

“There is no right or wrong when it comes to their thinking, which can lead to some incredible creative solutions.”

Designed by pupils, this open aired office not only lets workers be at one with nature, it also gets its energy from kinetic wind turbines, the build also includes a disco ball meeting room to help workers unwind. Picture: The LEGO GroupDesigned by pupils, this open aired office not only lets workers be at one with nature, it also gets its energy from kinetic wind turbines, the build also includes a disco ball meeting room to help workers unwind. Picture: The LEGO Group

The project at London Fields Primary, which came about after a brainstorming session held with 60 pupils, is part of LEGO’s Rebuild the World campaign, which looks to celebrate the power of children’s creativity.

Children were asked to design a school, house or office that would make people happy.

READ MORE: BBC encourages Hackney secondary schools to get involved in East London design challenge

Award winning writer, director, presenter and documentary maker Reggie Yates set the brief to the Year 4 pupils.

The LEGO Group unveils what homes could look like in the future, designed by London Fields Primary School children as part of its Rebuild The World campaign. Picture: The LEGO GroupThe LEGO Group unveils what homes could look like in the future, designed by London Fields Primary School children as part of its Rebuild The World campaign. Picture: The LEGO Group

He said: “I’ve always been passionate about nurturing talent and putting real energy behind creative thought, so seeing the incredible ideas the children came up with was inspiring. It’s clear that they are able to access ideas and thoughts that wouldn’t occur to us adults.”

Families can get involved and be in with a chance of winning a LEGO prize via the LEGO Life app by clicking here

Find out more by clicking here


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