Hackney re-use project gives children chance to turn waste materials into art

Young people aged eight to 11 worked with Artist Helena Doyle to create an art piece for London Craf

Young people aged eight to 11 worked with Artist Helena Doyle to create an art piece for London Craft Week. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

Children in Hackney have created an art installation made almost entirely from waste and non-recyclable materials such as cling film and sweet wrappers.

The project was made possible by Hackney Wick and Fish Island Creative Enterprise Zone Fund. Picture

The project was made possible by Hackney Wick and Fish Island Creative Enterprise Zone Fund. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

Artist Helena Doyle collaborated with young people aged eight to 11 years old to create a piece of installation art for London Craft Week.

The installation was created to highlight the abundance of waste materials available to artists in the UK.

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Artist Helena Doyle said: “I think it’s really important to teach children to question the materials we use everyday, to ask what they’re made from and where they go when we throw them away.

Hackney young people with artist Helena Doyle. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi

Hackney young people with artist Helena Doyle. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

“This creative reuse project allowed the children to explore different materials, learn new skills and create value from materials that otherwise would have ended up in landfill.”

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The art piece was inspired by traditional Polish chandeliers called Pajaki, pronounced pah-yonk-ee, traditionally made from rye straw and paper.

The children’s chandelier however, was made out of an old trampoline, cardboard tubes, bottle tops and other scrap materials.

The children made the chandelier out of things that would have been thrown away like an old trampoli

The children made the chandelier out of things that would have been thrown away like an old trampoline, clingfilm and cardboard tubes. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

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The project was set up by Hackney Arts and made possible by Hackney Wick and Fish Island Creative Enterprise Zone Fund.

Visit Stour Space gallery in Hackney Wick to see the installation which will be exhibited there until October 16.

Visit www.helenadoyle.co.uk for more information about the artist.

The installation will be exhibited at Stour Space gallery in Hackney Wick until October 16. Picture:

The installation will be exhibited at Stour Space gallery in Hackney Wick until October 16. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

To learn more about Hackney Arts visit www.hackneyarts.com

Artist Helena Doyle led the arts project set up by Hackney Arts. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi

Artist Helena Doyle led the arts project set up by Hackney Arts. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

The art piece was inspired by traditional Polish chandeliers called Pajaki, pronounced pah-yonk-ee.

The art piece was inspired by traditional Polish chandeliers called Pajaki, pronounced pah-yonk-ee. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

Hackney children took part in a project making an art installation out of waste materials like bottl

Hackney children took part in a project making an art installation out of waste materials like bottle caps. Picture: Christian Sinibaldi - Credit: Christian Sinibaldi

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