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Revealed: Deprivation levels in Hackney ranked by postcode

PUBLISHED: 16:34 04 November 2019 | UPDATED: 17:49 04 November 2019

Brenthouse Road in Hackney. The northern side of the road, where the houses are, are classed as among the 30pc most deprived in England; flats opposite fall into the 10pc most deprived. Picture: Google Satellite

Brenthouse Road in Hackney. The northern side of the road, where the houses are, are classed as among the 30pc most deprived in England; flats opposite fall into the 10pc most deprived. Picture: Google Satellite

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Sixteen neighbourhoods in Hackney are classed as among the 10pc most 'deprived' in England, according to new government figures.

Ickburgh School in Hackney Wick falls within one of Hackney's most deprived zones. Picture: Isabel InfantesIckburgh School in Hackney Wick falls within one of Hackney's most deprived zones. Picture: Isabel Infantes

An area of Hackney Wick including Mabley Street, Ickburgh School and the Wick Health Centre has been ranked 1,315 out of 32,844 lower super output areas (LSOAs) in England - making it officially the most hard-up neighbourhood in Hackney.

Streets bordering on the River Lea, including Windsor Wharf and the Gainsborough School, and parts of Clapton, Hackney Central, Manor House and Hoxton were also found to be struggling with the most acute levels of deprivation in the country.

The statistics are published by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government every four years.

Our interactive map and postcode tool shows how deprived your area is considered to be compared to the rest of the country.

The Mayor of Hackney, Phil Glanville, said while average ratings across the borough had improved, the deprivation indices did not tell the "whole story".

He said: "This relative measure tells us only how we compare to other areas which may be becoming worse off themselves.

"It tells us nothing about how difficult our residents are finding it to keep on top of the demands on their income and in Hackney,we know we have much more to do to help those worst-off and in persistent poverty."

The deprivation indices combine levels of low income, unemployment, education, health, crime, barriers to housing and the quality of the local environment.

Some areas of Hackney, including the streets between Victoria Park Road and Regent's Canal, were found to be more comfortably-off.

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But Hackney was also one of just five London boroughs where not one neighbourhood fell into the 10pc least deprived.

The least deprived zone in Hackney was six streets in the Clissold area, including Lordship Park and Queen Elizabeth's Walk, which was ranked at 18,241 - an improvement even on 2015, when it was ranked at 15,793.

But in other parts of the borough quality of life, according to the government's estimates, have worsened. Parts of Homerton and the Springfield area have seen their rating plummet in the last four years.

Hackney Council has recently drawn together its own more up-to-date information to create a Hackney Poverty Index and is drawing up strategies to tackle deprivation, including a 'Food Poverty Plan' and an Inclusive Economic Strategy to help those from disadvantaged backgrounds into careers.

The council's 'Stop the Knock' service also supports residents who have missed council tax payments, and recently consulted on - amongst other things - improved safety and access to green spaces in Dalston and Hackney Central.

Mr Glanville said: "Austerity measures have penalised some of the most vulnerable people. The Government's four-year freeze on working-age benefits and the two-child limit on child tax credits have had a knock-on effect on families across the country. These cuts, combined with universal credit and Local Housing Allowance not coming anywhere near rises in private rents, have had devastating impacts on our poorest residents.

"By 2020, we will have lost £140 million from our annual Government grant, around 45%."

Matt Bray, a spokesman for Hackney Community and Voluntary Service (CVS), which equips local community groups and charities to help tackle inequalities in the borough, said the umbrella body was "disappointed but not surprised" by the figures.

Mayor Phil Glanville and environment chief Cllr Jon Burke.Mayor Phil Glanville and environment chief Cllr Jon Burke.

He added: "Too many families in Hackney experience poverty and disadvantage; this impacts on all aspects of their lives including education, life chances, health and even life expectancy.

"Voluntary and community groups in Hackney are dealing with increasingly complex situations around poverty, food shortages and health crises arising out of austerity.

"Hackney CVS is committed to working for a fairer borough, where poverty is challenged and prosperity is shared more equally. With an election on the horizon, we would encourage all political parties to commit to tackling poverty and disadvantage in Hackney."

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