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Drug and alcohol misuse service opens in Hackney

PUBLISHED: 12:48 13 October 2020 | UPDATED: 12:48 13 October 2020

Natalie Travis, national head of public health and substance misuse service, giving a presentationThe City and Hackney Recovery Service, which opened on October 1. Picture: Turning Point

Natalie Travis, national head of public health and substance misuse service, giving a presentationThe City and Hackney Recovery Service, which opened on October 1. Picture: Turning Point

Archant

A recovery-focused drug and alcohol misuse service in Hackney has opened for the community.

The City and Hackney Recovery Service, which opened on October 1 on Mare Street, was jointly commissioned by the City of London Corporation and Hackney Council.

It is being run by social enterprise Turning Point in partnership with Mind CHWF (City, Hackney and Waltham Forest) and Antidote - a specialist LGBT drug and alcohol service provided by charity London Friend.

There will be women-only, as well as weekend and evening, clinics on offer.

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Director of public health for Hackney and the City of London, Dr Sandra Husbands, said the service will support residents, “ensuring they can access high-quality and timely assistance to improve their lives, health and wellbeing”.

“This also helps to reduce health and other inequalities,” she added. “We aim for this new service to help our residents to reduce their harm associated with substance misuse in a holistic way, no matter their background.”

Randall Anderson, chairman of the City of London Corporation’s community and children’s services committee, said: “Drug and alcohol misuse causes significant harm to people right across the capital.

“This important service, based in the heart of the community, will offer effective help and support to people suffering from these problems.”

Cllr Chris Kennedy, Hackney Council health chief, added: “This new service will provide a lifeline to some of our most vulnerable residents, especially during the difficult times presented by the current pandemic.”

Vanessa Morris, chief executive of Mind CHWF, said there is “no shame in seeking support”, while London Friend’s chief executive, Monty Moncrieff, said LGBT people are more likely to take drugs and have difficulty accessing services compared to the pubic as a whole.


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