Search

Shoreditch Sisters raise awareness of ovarian cancer

PUBLISHED: 13:14 22 February 2011 | UPDATED: 13:31 22 February 2011

Members of The Shoreditch Sisters WI who had their nails painted teal-colour for the launch of an ovarian cancer charity's awareness raising campaign

Members of The Shoreditch Sisters WI who had their nails painted teal-colour for the launch of an ovarian cancer charity's awareness raising campaign

Archant

The Shoreditch Sisters had their nails painted teal-colour on Monday night, to launch a campaign raising awareness of ovarian cancer.

Caroline Walters and Naomi Gardner of The Shoreditch Sisters WI who had their nails painted teal-colour for the launch of an ovarian cancer charity's awareness raising campaign

The Women’s Institute group - which has been labelled the trendiest in the country because of its young members – joined in ovarian cancer charity Ovacome’s Teal Tips campaign, by getting their nails painted a shade of duck-egg blue.

Ovacome wants women to wear teal-coloured nail polish on their finger tips, to mark Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month in March.

They hope other women will comment on the unusual colour and strike up a conversation about the disease.

Teal is the internationally recognised colour representing the disease, just as pink represents breast cancer.

Laura Southall and Lucy Harris of The Shoreditch Sisters WI who had their nails painted teal-colour for the launch of an ovarian cancer charity's awareness raising campaign

Rebecca Clark, President of the Shoreditch Sisters WI group - who met at underground club Concrete in Shoreditch High Street - said: “Awareness is key to recognising the impact of this disease, which until recently was known as the “silent killer,” because of its perceived vague symptoms.

“Hopefully all our distinctive nails will prompt questions and comments from friends and colleagues in the days following our meeting, so we can spread the message even further.”

Ovacome wants ovarian cancer to be given a bigger stage, as it affects more women than cervical cancer – yet few people actually know its symptoms.

They have come up with the acronym BEAT to help women to recall its main signs - B is for bloating that does not come and go, E is for eating less and feeling fuller quicker, A is for abdominal pain and T is for telling your GP.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Hackney Gazette. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Hackney Gazette