Makemore festival in Victoria Park showcases Britain’s endangered crafts like weaving and paper marbling

A printing workshop at the Makemore festival in Victoria Park. Picture: Mike Massaro

A printing workshop at the Makemore festival in Victoria Park. Picture: Mike Massaro - Credit: Mike Massaro

A festival in Victoria Park brought together more than 100 artists, crafters, cooks and musicians to champion independent artists and save Britain’s endangered crafts.

A street artist gets to work at the Makemore festival in Victoria Park. Picture: Mike Massaro

A street artist gets to work at the Makemore festival in Victoria Park. Picture: Mike Massaro - Credit: Mike Massaro

Over four days hands-on workshops at Makemore gave people the chance to try out bee keeping wood carving, and candle making, as well as weaving, paper marbling and furniture making which are identified as under threat by the Heritage Crafts Association.

Co-founder James Cartwright said: “Our aim with Makemore is to inspire the public to try new skills and show them how easy it is to start making.

“I hope guests have seen how these successful entrepreneurs are making a career from their passion and maybe give it a go themselves.

“We also wanted to highlight how in 50 years many of our country’s traditional skills will be extinct, which would be a crying shame.”

The Heavy Beat Brass Band performs at the Makemore festival in Victoria Park. Picture: Mike Massaro

The Heavy Beat Brass Band performs at the Makemore festival in Victoria Park. Picture: Mike Massaro - Credit: Mike Massaro

Modern makers exhibiting at the festival included Wallace and Gromit creators Aardman Animations, polish chandelier artist Karolina Merska and street artist Nathan Bowen.

The family friendly festival had a line-up of children’s entertainment and workshops every day from companies like the Polka Theatre and Little Angel Theatre.