New community mural painted by residents unveiled in Stoke Newington

Unveiling ceremony

Unveiling ceremony - Credit: Eddie Bradley

A community mural painted and designed by residents has been unveiled in Stoke Newington.

The mural was designed by 25 residents of Stamford Hill Estate as a patchwork of shapes and colours under the guidance of fellow resident and artist Rose Hill.

Islington-born Rose has previously been commissioned by art dealer Charles Saatchi, actor Robert Webb and designer Sadie Frost and has taught at the V&A and the British Library. 

Rose Hill

Before and after the mural was painted - Credit: Rose Hill

The 38-year-old said: “Painting murals is a really beautiful and mindful activity that brings everybody together and gives them a huge sense of achievement because they are creating something that is going to be seen by everyone walking past.”

Rose studied textiles at Chelsea University, worked in interior design and exhibited pet portraits in London and Japan, before launching her new company Co-Creative Connection last year.

The company helps communities co-design, develop, and paint their own murals and was created from Rose’s desire to connect people through creativity and mindful art activities during the pandemic. 

The mural being painted

The mural being painted - Credit: Denise Arthur

Her first project was realised last summer with a mural for the Sundial Community Centre in Tower Hamlets and Hackney.

Most Read

The most recent project in Stoke Newington allowed residents to transform a mouldy wall on their estate into a bright and joyful artwork. 

During a one-day design workshop the participants collectively decided on the colour pallet before each designing their own section of the wall. 

Rose Hill jumps for joy

Rose Hill jumps for joy - Credit: Dave Norman

After a four-day de-moulding process around 35 residents painted the wall over eight days.

Estate resident Kirsty Jones said: “While working on the project I met lots of neighbours whom I had never met before, the kids loved it and wanted to be involved. 

“We had residents who admitted they don’t engage with people actually come out to say they loved the mural.”

Rose Hill

Rose Hill - Credit: David Norman

The focus was on colour and patterns which Rose described as an inclusive approach as it allowed everyone to express what they were thinking and feeling without having to be exact.

She said: “The main goal and meaning behind the mural was about bringing people together and bringing joyfulness to the area.” 

The project was funded by one of The Guinness Partnership’s Aspire Awards.